Only Artists can survive Rejection!

Every writer sooner or later will nourish a longstanding relationship with rejection. The history says that if you are getting rejected, you are in a fine company. Quite a few authors get a green signal from the publishers at the very first approach. However, getting published does not always mean that one is a good writer, not even the best sellers let you gain the dignity of an esteemed author. What sets a benchmark for you is the number of minds you have managed to capture and inspired to think alike!

Rejection must be followed by success & not otherwise, for Team PepperScript believes that one must, “pull the strength someone put in to de-motivate you to motivate yourself because, hope is beautiful.”

George Orwell, Patrick White, Norman Mailer, D. H. Lawrence, and Leo Tolstoy were all knocked back by publishers. J. K. Rowling of Harry Potter fame was rejected by 5 publishers, Twilight was rejected 14 times and Dr. Seuss was rejected 23 times before Vanguard Press accepted his renowned series of 44 children’s classics. In between several rejections, they revised and rewrote and resubmitted, and the attainment was unconquerable without the endless rejections!

Snoopy-Writer

However, with the ease of access for self-publishing the equation of rejection with writers has been partially removed. ‘Rejection’, should instead be considered as a frienemy, for it enhances your flaws! Ever wondered if there is any pattern to rejection? Perhaps the script is of a very poor quality, or may be too daring, or they it does not fit the criterion of the publisher. But persistence will prevail one fine day! Never overlook the considerations and recommendations given by the editor or the publishers, make the desired changes, revise and submit again, and may be yet again!

Rejection is just one aspect of being a writer, and if you are an ardent one, here are few facts to lift your spirits:

  1.   Rejection is good, really: If you get rejected, once, twice, several times, consider it as a blessing! Believe it or not, you are just been granted few more months or certainly years to rework and develop your writing. The fear of rejection is innate and inevitable. But keeping yourself motivated and being open to suggestions will always help!
  2.      It’s not always a writer’s fault: Yes! It is not the writer who regrets writing a good story. Sometimes it is the publishers who regret rejecting a bestseller. Quality writing is only one of the several reasons that writers often claim to lack. Instead, there could be other reasons like the genre does not match, or the editors’ preferences clashes with that of the publishers.
  3.      Ego is a dirty word: Ouch! They rejected my writing, how could they? More than rejection, ego should be the writers’ enemy! Every reader has a different interpretation and perspective. One might understand your creative writing, while another might just give it a go! Few might reread it and still might not understand, hence the writer faces rejection.
  4.      Rejection can be an inspiration: It can be discouraging to put a lot of work into a piece of work and receive dismissive comments. So take a few days or weeks to digest the disappointment and plan your next move. The key is to keep practicing!
  5.      Reason your rejection: Rejection could be maddening, but at the end it serves a purpose. Moreover, any novel in the market without facing prior criticism or rejection has suffered. If you really wish to become a writer, a published author then you better face the reality, conquer your flaws and learn from your rejections.

So, now we know that most renowned writers get to the publishing world through the doorway of a rejection letter. But if the quest to be read consumes your life then do not let the rejection deflate you and your purposes! We strongly believe that if you like to read what you have written, the possibility is that the readers would want to read it too.

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